Introduction to Service Transition Tutorial

1.1 Introduction To Service Transition

Learning Unit 1 – is about Introduction to Service Transition. In this unit we will recap on ITIL Fundamentals - Service Management Principles; Service Transition Purpose, Scope, Value to Business and context in relation to other lifecycle stages.

1.2 ITIL®

Before we get into the details of Service Transition, let us first look at ITIL lifecycle and positioning of Service Transition in the lifecycle. ITIL is used by organizations worldwide to establish and improve capabilities in Service Management. Standards as ISO/IEC 20000 provide a formal and universal standard for organizations seeking to have their Service Management capabilities audited and certified. While ISO/IEC 20000 is a standard to be achieved and maintained, ITIL offers a body of knowledge useful for achieving the standard. Now moving to the component, The ITIL Library has the following components: The ITIL life cycle will be a circle consisting of one core which is best practice guidance applicable to all types of organizations that provide services to a Business. Now this core is covered by the ITIL Complementary Guidance which is a complementary set of publications with guidance specific to industry sectors, organization types, operating models and technology architectures. As you are now aware of basic definitions and understanding of ITIL, let us understand what the standard publication forms a life cycle .The publications of ITIL Lifecycle phase of the ITIL 2011 Core are represented by a Volume in the Library which includes • Service Strategy • Service Design • Service Transition • Service Operation • Continual Service Improvement This course is about understanding Service Transition in the Service Management Life cycle. Let us continue to recap on the ITIL terms in the next slide.

1.2 ITIL®

Before we get into the details of Service Transition, let us first look at ITIL lifecycle and positioning of Service Transition in the lifecycle. ITIL is used by organizations worldwide to establish and improve capabilities in Service Management. Standards as ISO/IEC 20000 provide a formal and universal standard for organizations seeking to have their Service Management capabilities audited and certified. While ISO/IEC 20000 is a standard to be achieved and maintained, ITIL offers a body of knowledge useful for achieving the standard. Now moving to the component, The ITIL Library has the following components: The ITIL life cycle will be a circle consisting of one core which is best practice guidance applicable to all types of organizations that provide services to a Business. Now this core is covered by the ITIL Complementary Guidance which is a complementary set of publications with guidance specific to industry sectors, organization types, operating models and technology architectures. As you are now aware of basic definitions and understanding of ITIL, let us understand what the standard publication forms a life cycle .The publications of ITIL Lifecycle phase of the ITIL 2011 Core are represented by a Volume in the Library which includes • Service Strategy • Service Design • Service Transition • Service Operation • Continual Service Improvement This course is about understanding Service Transition in the Service Management Life cycle. Let us continue to recap on the ITIL terms in the next slide.

1.3 Recap from the "Foundation" Service Management Principles

In the previous slide we spoke about ITIL as a framework for Service Management. Thus To start with we need to understand the basics of the Concept of Service and Value. This raises a question about what is a Service? What is our understanding of the service? Service is defined as “a means of delivering value to Customers by facilitating outcomes Customers want to achieve without the ownership of specific costs and risks” We can refer to anything around us in this universe as service. Let’s take an example of the room around you, take anything in that room right from the smallest item to the biggest, now start thinking about the item you choose and see, any item that you choose serves some purpose to you and it has been provided by seller who manufactures this item to fulfill the same purpose of yours. Here the item you choose is your service, manufacturer is the Service provider and you who utilize the service is the Customer. Now let me ask you what does the IT Service do? The answer would be: They enhance the performance of those Customer Assets to deliver better, or increased Business outcomes (and hence delivers Business value). How does the IT service provider deliver these Services? It is by effective use of Service assets (Their resources and capabilities). So in this context: • Service Assets are the Resources and Capabilities of the Service Provider (Service Provider’s Assets) that are utilized to deliver the IT Services to the Business/Customer. • Customer Assets are the Resources and Capabilities of the Customer (Customer’s Assets) that are utilized to deliver Business outcomes. These assets make use of the IT Services to enhance their performance or to remove some constraints. • Here it is important that the Service Provider has to define a Service always in connection to the specific Customer Assets to which the Utility of the service is delivered to.. Now when we say service is the means of delivering value to the Customers then how we deliver value? What does value contain? Can we quantify the value? We can understand this concept with the Utility and Warranty model: From the Customer’s perspective, value consists of two primary elements: utility or fitness for purpose and warranty or fitness for use. Utility is perceived by the Customer from the attributes of the service that have a positive effect on the performance of tasks associated with desired outcomes. Removal or relaxation of constraints on performance is also perceived as a positive effect. Warranty is derived from the positive effect being available when needed, insufficient capacity or magnitude, and dependably in terms of Continuity and security. Utility is what the Customer gets, and warranty is how it is delivered. Customers cannot benefit from anything that is fit for purpose but not fit for use, and vice versa. It is useful to separate the logic of utility from the logic of warranty for the purpose of Design, development and improvement considering all the separate controllable Inputs allows for a wider range of solutions to the problem of creating, maintaining and increasing value. Remember absolute quantification of value is not possible. Next we will look at Processes, Procedures and Work Instructions: Definition and the Characters of Functions and, Roles Moving on let us see as a service provider how to deliver value to Customers? The service provider has to execute certain activities in order to deliver the value to Customers in the form of service. This starts from understanding what the Customer wants or say understand Customer expectations Customer expectations lead to define a specific set of activities which are to be executed by the people in order to deliver Value. These specialized sets of activities are termed as a process. The process is defined as: A set of activities designed to accomplish a specific objective. A process takes defined Inputs and turns them into defined outputs. A process may include roles, responsibilities, tools and management controls required to deliver the outputs. We also need to learn the basic characteristics of any process. The characteristics of the process are that It is measurable, It delivers specific results as expected by Customers, Primary result as agreed with Customers are delivered to Customers or stakeholders and It responds to specific events or triggers. Now let us understand the concept of Functions. Functions typically define roles and the associated authority and responsibility for a specific performance and outcomes. Coordination between functions through shared processes is a common pattern in organization design. Functions tend to optimize their work methods locally to focus on assigned outcomes. Poor coordination between functions combined with an inward focus leads to functional silos that hinder alignment and feedback critical to the success of the organization as a whole. Well defined processes can improve productivity within and across functions. Now we have covered the concepts of service, value, value creation model, and processes executed by the service provider for delivering value to the Customer and We have already discussed a few concepts in earlier trainings however to refresh on these conceps, let us look into the details once again. The concept of database formation is based on DIKW (Data-to-Information-to- Knowledge-to-Wisdom) model. Specifically within IT Service Management, Knowledge Management will be focused within the Service Knowledge Management System (SKMS) concerned, as its name implies, with knowledge. Underpinning this knowledge will be a considerable quantity of Data, which will be held in a central logical repository or Configuration Management System (CMS) and Configuration Management Database (CMDB). However, clearly the SKMS is a broader concept that covers a much wider base of knowledge Let us now move on to the next slide to understand ITIL’s relationship with other Business Management practice guides.

1.3 Recap from the "Foundation" Service Management Principles

In the previous slide we spoke about ITIL as a framework for Service Management. Thus To start with we need to understand the basics of the Concept of Service and Value. This raises a question about what is a Service? What is our understanding of the service? Service is defined as “a means of delivering value to Customers by facilitating outcomes Customers want to achieve without the ownership of specific costs and risks” We can refer to anything around us in this universe as service. Let’s take an example of the room around you, take anything in that room right from the smallest item to the biggest, now start thinking about the item you choose and see, any item that you choose serves some purpose to you and it has been provided by seller who manufactures this item to fulfill the same purpose of yours. Here the item you choose is your service, manufacturer is the Service provider and you who utilize the service is the Customer. Now let me ask you what does the IT Service do? The answer would be: They enhance the performance of those Customer Assets to deliver better, or increased Business outcomes (and hence delivers Business value). How does the IT service provider deliver these Services? It is by effective use of Service assets (Their resources and capabilities). So in this context: • Service Assets are the Resources and Capabilities of the Service Provider (Service Provider’s Assets) that are utilized to deliver the IT Services to the Business/Customer. • Customer Assets are the Resources and Capabilities of the Customer (Customer’s Assets) that are utilized to deliver Business outcomes. These assets make use of the IT Services to enhance their performance or to remove some constraints. • Here it is important that the Service Provider has to define a Service always in connection to the specific Customer Assets to which the Utility of the service is delivered to.. Now when we say service is the means of delivering value to the Customers then how we deliver value? What does value contain? Can we quantify the value? We can understand this concept with the Utility and Warranty model: From the Customer’s perspective, value consists of two primary elements: utility or fitness for purpose and warranty or fitness for use. Utility is perceived by the Customer from the attributes of the service that have a positive effect on the performance of tasks associated with desired outcomes. Removal or relaxation of constraints on performance is also perceived as a positive effect. Warranty is derived from the positive effect being available when needed, insufficient capacity or magnitude, and dependably in terms of Continuity and security. Utility is what the Customer gets, and warranty is how it is delivered. Customers cannot benefit from anything that is fit for purpose but not fit for use, and vice versa. It is useful to separate the logic of utility from the logic of warranty for the purpose of Design, development and improvement considering all the separate controllable Inputs allows for a wider range of solutions to the problem of creating, maintaining and increasing value. Remember absolute quantification of value is not possible. Next we will look at Processes, Procedures and Work Instructions: Definition and the Characters of Functions and, Roles Moving on let us see as a service provider how to deliver value to Customers? The service provider has to execute certain activities in order to deliver the value to Customers in the form of service. This starts from understanding what the Customer wants or say understand Customer expectations Customer expectations lead to define a specific set of activities which are to be executed by the people in order to deliver Value. These specialized sets of activities are termed as a process. The process is defined as: A set of activities designed to accomplish a specific objective. A process takes defined Inputs and turns them into defined outputs. A process may include roles, responsibilities, tools and management controls required to deliver the outputs. We also need to learn the basic characteristics of any process. The characteristics of the process are that It is measurable, It delivers specific results as expected by Customers, Primary result as agreed with Customers are delivered to Customers or stakeholders and It responds to specific events or triggers. Now let us understand the concept of Functions. Functions typically define roles and the associated authority and responsibility for a specific performance and outcomes. Coordination between functions through shared processes is a common pattern in organization design. Functions tend to optimize their work methods locally to focus on assigned outcomes. Poor coordination between functions combined with an inward focus leads to functional silos that hinder alignment and feedback critical to the success of the organization as a whole. Well defined processes can improve productivity within and across functions. Now we have covered the concepts of service, value, value creation model, and processes executed by the service provider for delivering value to the Customer and We have already discussed a few concepts in earlier trainings however to refresh on these conceps, let us look into the details once again. The concept of database formation is based on DIKW (Data-to-Information-to- Knowledge-to-Wisdom) model. Specifically within IT Service Management, Knowledge Management will be focused within the Service Knowledge Management System (SKMS) concerned, as its name implies, with knowledge. Underpinning this knowledge will be a considerable quantity of Data, which will be held in a central logical repository or Configuration Management System (CMS) and Configuration Management Database (CMDB). However, clearly the SKMS is a broader concept that covers a much wider base of knowledge Let us now move on to the next slide to understand ITIL’s relationship with other Business Management practice guides.

1.4 ITIL's Relationship With Other Best Management Practice Guides

The slide depicts the different project management models that can be used across various Business management practice guides along with ITIL.

1.4 ITIL's Relationship With Other Best Management Practice Guides

The slide depicts the different project management models that can be used across various Business management practice guides along with ITIL.

1.5 Service Transition: Purpose and Objectives

Service transition is a very important stage within the service lifecycle. It ensures that the requirements of Service Strategy encoded in Service Design are effectively realized through to the delivery of live services within the Service Operation stage. The Service Design Package and other outputs from Service Design are used by Service Transition to build, test and deploy the service solutions into live operation, fulfilling agreed customer and business requirements. The key purpose of Service Transition is to ensure that new, modified or retired services meet the expectations of the business as documented in the Service Strategy and Service Design stages of the lifecycle. The objectives of Service Transition stage are to : • Plan and manage service changes efficiently and effectively; • Manage risks relating to new, changed or retired services; • Successfully deploy service releases into supported environments; • Set correct expectations on the performance and use of new or changed services; • Ensure that service changes create the expected business value; and • Provide good-quality knowledge and information about services and service assets. Let’s now understand the scope of Service Transition in the next slide.

1.6 Scope

As part of service lifecycle, Service Transition is entrusted with a wide scope and covers the following aspects : • The development and improvement of capabilities for transitioning new and changed services into supported environments, including release planning, building, testing, evaluation and deployment. This also includes managing the complexity associated with changes to services and service management processes. • Service retirement and transfer of services between service providers. The transfer of services may be of various types like: • Transfer of services from an internal IT service provider to a new supplier; • From one supplier to another supplier; • Transfer back from external supplier to internal IT service provider; • Moving to a partnership, co-sourcing or multi-sourcing model; • Down-sizing, up-sizing or offshoring; and • Joint venture, merger or acquisition. • Ensuring that the requirements from Service Strategy, developed in Service Design, are effectively realized in Service Operation while controlling the risks of failure and subsequent disruption. Let’s understand this with a help of a diagram in the next slide.

1.7 Scope

In our last slide we discussed about scope of service transition. This slide explains the involvement of other stages in service transition. Let us understand them in detail. Service Transition combines practices in release management, program management and risk management and places them in the practical context of Service Management. It provides guidance on managing the complexity related to changes to services and Service Management processes, preventing undesired consequences while allowing for innovation. There may be situations when some activities do not apply to a particular transition. For example the transfer of a set of services from one organization to another may not involve release planning, build, test and acceptance. The following lifecycle processes in this publication support all lifecycle stages: • Change Management • Service Asset and Configuration Management • Knowledge Management. Service Transition uses all the processes described in the other ITIL publications as it is responsible for testing these processes, either as part of a new or changed service or as part of testing changes to the Service Management processes. Service level management is important to ensure that customer expectations are managed during Service Transition. Incident and problem management are important for handling incidents and problems during testing, pilot and deployment activities. The following activities are excluded from the scope of Service Transition best practices: • Minor modifications to the production services and environment, e.g. replacement of a failed PC or printer, installation of standard software on a PC or server, or a new user • Ongoing Continual Service Improvements that do not significantly impact the services or service provider’s capability to deliver the services, e.g. request fulfillment activities driven from Service Operations.

1.8 Service Transition: Value To Business

We will now look at the benefits derived by business from Service Transition stage. An effective Service Transition ensures that the new or changed services are better aligned with the customer’s business operations. Adopting and implementing standard and consistent approaches for Service Transition will result in various benefits to business and customers. • They enable project teams to estimate the cost, timing, resource requirement and risks associated with Service Transition stage more accurately; • Following the defined processes and standards will result in higher volumes of successful changes; • It will be easier for people to adopt and follow the build, test and deployment procedures; • The use of consistent approaches enable Service Transition assets to be shared and re-used across projects and services; • Due to better planning and coordination delays from unexpected clashes and dependencies are reduced; • Documented plans and procedures help in reducing the effort spent on managing the Service Transition test and pilot environments; • The adoption of communication plans improve expectation setting for all stakeholders involved in Service Transition including customers, users, suppliers, partners and projects; • The validations and tests planned and performed increase confidence amongst all stakeholders that the new or changed service can be delivered to specification without impacting other services or stakeholders; • Adopting a holistic transition approach ensures that new or changed services will be maintainable and cost-effective; and finally • Following the Service Asset and Configuration Management process and approach will result in improved control of service assets and configurations. In the next slide we will discuss the context of Service transition in the Service lifecycle.

1.9 Context Of Service Transition In Service Lifecycle

Now let us discuss the context of Service Transition in Service Lifecycle. You are by now familiar with the five phases of service lifecycle and the relevant ITIL Core publications. The ITIL Core consists of five lifecycle publications namely: Service Strategy, Service Design, Service Transition, Service Operation and Continual Service Improvement. Each publication provides part of guidance necessary for an integrated approach to service management. Each publication addresses capabilities having direct impact on a service provider’s performance. Service Strategy is the hub around which the service lifecycle revolves. ITIL Service Strategy provides guidance on how to view service management not only as an organizational capability but also as a strategic asset. It describes the principles underpinning the practice of service management which are useful for developing service management policies, guidelines and processes across the ITIL service lifecycle. Service Design is an important stage in the lifecycle as it turns a service strategy into a plan for delivering the business objectives. ITIL Service Design provides guidance for the design and development of services and service management practices. It covers design principles and methods for converting strategic objectives into portfolios of services and service assets. Service Transition is the stage during which the designs are transformed into live services. ITIL Service Transition provides guidance for the development and improvement of capabilities for introducing new and changed services into supported environments. It describes how to transition an organization from one state to another while controlling risk and supporting organizational knowledge for decision support. It also covers the best practice in transition planning and support, change management, service asset and configuration management, release and deployment management, service validation and testing, change evaluation and knowledge management. Service Operation is the stage during which the customers and users start using and realizing the value of the services. It enables them to achieve the desired outcomes. Strategic objectives are ultimately realized through service operation, therefore making it a critical capability. ITIL Service Operation provides guidance on how to maintain stability in service operation, allowing for changes in design, scale, scope and service levels. It includes guidance on achieving effectiveness and efficiency in the delivery and support of services to ensure value for the customer, the users and the service provider. Once services become operational, they need to be regularly reviewed and improved to meet the changing requirements of the business. ITIL Continual Service Improvement provides guidance on creating and maintaining value for customers through better strategy, design, transition and operation of services. It also describes the best practice for achieving incremental and large-scale improvements in service quality, operational efficiency and business continuity, and for ensuring that the service portfolio continues to be aligned to business needs. Let’s understand the processes within Service Transition.

1.10 Processes Within Service Transition

There are seven processes detailed in the ITIL Service Transition publication. Some processes are specific to Service Transition stage only and some span across the service life cycle. • The processes with significant activities throughout the service lifecycle are : • Change Management; • Service Asset and Configuration Management; and • Knowledge Management. • The processes which have most of their activities in the service transition stage only are • Transition Planning and Support; • Release and Deployment Management; • Service Validation and Testing; and • Change Evaluation. With this we have come to the end of learning unit 1, let us quickly summarize in the next slide.

1.11 Learning Unit 1 Summary

Here is the summary of topics that were covered so far.. • The purpose of Service Transition is to ensure that new, modified or retired services meet the expectations of the business as documented in Service Strategy and Service Design stages of the lifecycle. • Scope of Service Transition covers the development and improvement of capabilities for transitioning new and changed services into supported environments, including release planning, building, testing, evaluation and deployment. • Service Transition ensures that the requirements from Service Strategy, developed in Service Design, are effectively realized in Service Operation while controlling the risks of failure and subsequent disruption. • The key value to business from Service Transition stage is that the new or changed services are better aligned with the customer’s business operations. • The seven processes within Service Transition phase are Transition Planning and Support, Change Management, Service Asset and Configuration Management, Release and Deployment Management, Service Validation and Testing, Change Evaluation and Knowledge Management.

  • Disclaimer
  • PMP, PMI, PMBOK, CAPM, PgMP, PfMP, ACP, PBA, RMP, SP, and OPM3 are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.

We use cookies on this site for functional and analytical purposes. By using the site, you agree to be cookied and to our Terms of Use. Find out more

Request more information

For individuals
For business
Name*
Email*
Phone Number*
Your Message (Optional)

By proceeding, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

We are looking into your query.
Our consultants will get in touch with you soon.

A Simplilearn representative will get back to you in one business day.

First Name*
Last Name*
Email*
Phone Number*
Company*
Job Title*

By proceeding, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy