Introduction to PRINCE2 Processes Tutorial

11.1 Introduction to PRINCE2® Processes

Hello and welcome to PRINCE2® Foundation Certification course offered by Simplilearn. This lesson is about PRINCE2® processes. A process is a structured set of activities designed to accomplish a specific objective. Projects involve various activities that are executed to achieve project’s objectives, theme’s purposes and to ensure that project is based on PRINCE2® principles. These activities are grouped under a set of processes.

11.2 Objectives

After completing this lesson, you will be able to: ?List the PRINCE2® processes ?Describe the PRINCE2® journey ?Explain the PRINCE2® process model ?Explain the structure of the process chapters ?List the management products

11.3 Seven PRINCE2® Processes

PRINCE2® is a process-based approach for project management. A process is a structured set of activities designed to accomplish a specific objective. It takes one or more defined inputs and turns them into defined outputs. There are seven processes in PRINCE2®, which provide the set of activities required to direct, manage and deliver a project successfully. These seven processes are: ‘Starting up a Project’, ‘Directing a Project’, ‘Initiating a Project’, ‘Controlling a Stage’, ‘Managing Product Delivery’, ‘Managing a Stage Boundary’ and ‘Closing a Project’.

11.4 PRINCE2® Journey

The image shows how each process is used throughout a project’s life. There are four levels of management in PRINCE2®. They are corporate or programme, direction, management and delivering. The three levels Directing, Managing and Delivering are within the project. The image also illustrates how activities of seven processes are performed by various levels during the project. Project Board sets direction and makes key decisions throughout the life of the project. Project Board’s activities are covered by the ‘Directing a Project’ process or DP process. These activities span throughout the project life including pre-project and final delivery stage of the project. ‘Starting up a Project’ process or SU process is also used by both the directing and managing levels. The decision about the project whether it is worthwhile and viable to start is taken in ‘Starting up a Project’ process. Then the initiation of the project is authorised. During ‘Initiating a Project’ process or IP Process, the detailed planning is done, the strategies are defined and the project controls are established. During the initiation stage, another process that is ‘Managing Stage Boundary’ is used to plan the next stage. During subsequent delivery stages, the Project Manager manages the day-to-day work on stage by stage basis. The Project Manager ensures that project records such as Issue Register, Risk Register, Quality Register and Configuration Item Records are maintained. The Project Manager keeps the Project Board informed about the progress through regular Highlight Reports. The ‘Controlling a Stage’ process controls each stage. During ‘Managing Product Delivery’, the Team Managers or team members produce the product by executing the Work Packages. At the end of each management stage, the Project Manager requests a permission to proceed to the next stage. The project is a temporary undertaking and so during the final stage the project is closed. The final stage includes the activities covered by ‘Closing a Project’ process. There should be at least two management stages, the first one is the initiation stage and at least any one of the other management stages. Many PRINCE2® processes are executed during these stages.

11.5 PRINCE2® Journey—Pre-project

There is always a trigger or some compelling reasons to start a new project. The trigger for the project could be almost anything. In PRINCE2®, this trigger is called a project mandate, which is based on market intelligence reports, feasibility study or a request for proposal. Once there is a project mandate, ‘Starting up a Project’ process helps to identify whether the project is viable and worthwhile prior to the activity to fully scope the project. This means, before deciding to go full-fledged on a project, a feasibility study of the project is carried out via ‘Starting up a Project’ process. ‘Starting up a Project’ process culminates in the production of a Project Brief and a Stage Plan for project initiation. The Project Board reviews the Project Brief and decides whether to initiate the project. It states the level of authority to be delegated to the Project Manager for the initiation stage.

11.6 PRINCE2® Journey—Initiation Stage

Let us look at what happens in the initiation stage. After it has been decided to proceed with the project, it needs to be planned in detail. The funding requirements of the project needs to be obtained and controls should be defined to ensure that the project proceeds in accordance to the wishes of those paying for it and those who will use the product. The initiation stage culminates in the production of the Project Initiation Documentation or PID, which is reviewed by the Project Board. PID can be considered as a Project Management Plan that explains how each of the project aspects would be managed.

11.7 PRINCE2® Journey—Subsequent Delivery Stages

After the Project Initiation stage is over, the Project goes through one or more management stages for its completion. The Project Board delegates day-to-day control to the Project Manager on a stage-by-stage basis. This means that Project Board gives control to a Project Manager for one stage of a Project. If that stage is completed successfully by the Project Manager, the Project Board gives permission for the next stage. The Project Manager informs the Project Board of progress through the regular Highlight Reports. In the ‘Managing Product Delivery’ process, the Team Manager(s) or team members execute assigned Work Packages and the keep the Project Manager appraised of progress via Checkpoint Reports. It is the Project Manager who assigns the Work Packages to be delivered to the Team Manager(s) and gets status update on Work Packages via Checkpoint Reports. Towards the end of each management stage, the Project Manager requests permission to proceed to the next stage by reporting how the stage performed, providing an update to the Business Case and planning the next management stage in detail. The activities to manage each stage boundary are covered in the ‘Managing a Stage Boundary’ process.

11.8 PRINCE2® Journey—Final Delivery Stage

A key characteristic of a Project is its completion. As a project is a temporary undertaking, during the final stage it is time to decommission the project. The Project Board needs to be satisfied that the recipients of the project’s product are in a position to own and use them on an on-going basis. If they are satisfied, the products can be transitioned into operational use and the project can close. The project should be assessed for performance against its original plan and the resources assigned to the project need to be released. The activities to decommission a project are covered by the ‘Closing a Project’ or CP process.

11.9 PRINCE2® Process Model

The image shown illustrates the process model of PRINCE2® methodology, and how each process is used throughout a project’s life. In this model, the processes are aligned to the management levels of corporate or programme, direction, management and delivering. The triggers between each process are shown. For example, the project mandate triggers the ‘Starting up a Project’ process. A request to initiate a project triggers the ‘Directing a Project’ process. Request to approve Exception Plan once again triggers the ‘Directing a Project’ process. The completed Work Package triggers ‘Controlling a Stage’ process. When a project end is approaching, it triggers the ‘Closing a Project’ process. It is to be noted that at the end of the initiation stage, the ‘Initiating a Project’ process is used to request Project Board approval to initiate the project (with the submission of the Project Initiation Documentation) and in parallel, the ‘Managing a Stage Boundary’ process is used to request Project Board approval of the Stage Plan for the second management stage. Also, the closure activities are planned and approved as part of the stage approval for the final stage; therefore the ‘Closing a Project’ process takes place in the final stage.

11.10 Structure of the Process Chapters

Let us understand how PRINCE2® chapters are organised. PRINCE2® processes comprise a set of activities, which may run in series or in parallel and PRINCE2® activities comprise a set of recommended actions designed to achieve a particular result. For each of the PRINCE2® Processes, the set of activities associated with that process will be discussed. The image shows the relationship between processes, activities and actions.

11.11 Management Products

Management products are information sets used by the PRINCE2® processes to enable certain roles to take action and/or make decisions. Most of the baseline products evolve during pre-project and initiation stage activities. The baseline products are reviewed and updated at the end of each stage. There are three types of management products: baselines, records and reports. Baseline management products are those that define aspects of the project and once approved are subject to change control. Some examples of baseline products are: Business case, Benefits Review Plan, Communication Management Strategy, Risk Management Strategy and Plans (Stage Plans, Team Plans). Most of the baseline products evolve during pre-project and initiation stage activities. The baseline products are reviewed and updated at the end of each stage. The next type of management products is records. Records are dynamic management products that maintain information regarding project progress. Some examples are: Configuration Item Records, Daily Log and Lessons Log. The third type of management products is reports. Reports are management products providing a snapshot of the status of the certain aspects of the project. Some examples are: Checkpoint Report, End Project Report and Exception Report. A Team Manager updates the Work Package to Project Manager on a regular basis via Checkpoint reports.

11.12 Key to Process Diagrams

The image shown represents key to process diagrams. The symbols used in the image are used when drawing a process diagram.

11.13 Quiz

The quiz section will help to check your understanding of the concepts covered.

11.14 Summary

Here is a quick recap of what we have learnt in this lesson: ?The seven PRINCE2® processes are: ‘Starting up a Project’, ‘Directing a Project’, ‘Initiating a Project’, ‘Controlling a Stage’, ‘Managing Product Delivery’, ‘Managing a Stage Boundary’ and ‘Closing a Project’. ?In the PRINCE2® process model, the processes are aligned to the management levels of corporate or programme, direction, management and delivering. ?PRINCE2® processes comprise a set of activities, which may run in series or in parallel and PRINCE2® activities comprise a set of recommended actions designed to achieve a particular result. ?There are three types of management products: baselines, records and reports.

11.15 Thank You

In the next lesson, we will discuss the first process, which is ‘Starting up a Project’.

  • Disclaimer
  • PMP, PMI, PMBOK, CAPM, PgMP, PfMP, ACP, PBA, RMP, SP, and OPM3 are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.

We use cookies on this site for functional and analytical purposes. By using the site, you agree to be cookied and to our Terms of Use. Find out more

Request more information

For individuals
For business
Name*
Email*
Phone Number*
Your Message (Optional)

By proceeding, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

We are looking into your query.
Our consultants will get in touch with you soon.

A Simplilearn representative will get back to you in one business day.

First Name*
Last Name*
Email*
Phone Number*
Company*
Job Title*

By proceeding, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy