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Defining a Programme-Steps 13 to 17 Tutorial

1 Defining a Programme Steps 13 to 17

This lesson focuses on steps 13 to 17 involved in the process, ‘defining a programme’. Let us begin with the objectives of this lesson in the next screen.

2 Objectives

By the end of this lesson, you will be able to: ? Explain steps 13 to 17 in the process, ‘defining a programme’ In the next screen, we will focus on step 13, that is, ‘develop the programme plan’.

3 Step 13 Develop the Programme Plan

The programme plan is developed by bringing together the information on projects, resources, timescales, costs, risks and monitoring and control. As the amount of information increases, the programme plan will improve. Initially, an outline programme plan displaying the estimated relative timescales for projects is created. This plan must identify where assurance reviews of progress and benefits realisation can be carried out. It is perfectly acceptable for the programme plan to incorporate and aggregate other plans to implement governance strategies, where this is optimal. Once this happens, there will be one programme plan that will include benefits realisation plan, resource management plan and others. In the next screen, we will discuss step 14, that is, ‘develop and confirm the programme business case’.

4 Step 14 Develop and Confirm Programme Business Case

The business case starts taking shape in the process, ‘identifying a programme’. It is further developed in the process, ‘defining a programme’. Once arrangements for managing a programme are developed, the final business case emerges. The business case brings together the information about the programme covering the costs, benefits, timings and risks, so that the overall value for money and achievability of the programme can be assessed. This in turn will help in making appropriate management decisions about the viability of the programme. The business case needs to be refined as the programme proceeds, especially at the end of tranches, where formal reviews objectively judge the success achieved so far. In the next screen, we will focus on step 15, which is ‘consolidate programme definition’.

5 Step 15 Consolidate the Programme Definition

The process involved in the step, ‘consolidate programme definition’ is as follows. The information produced in the process, ‘defining a programme’, can be consolidated. This can be developed as a complete set of documents including the blueprint, business case, various plans and others with an executive summary. It can also be developed as a simple summary with links to other documents. The full set of programme definition documents should be updated as per the process followed in ‘configuration and change control’. The programme definition documents are assembled into information baselines. In the next screen, we discuss the step 16, which is ‘prepare for first tranche’.

6 Step 16 Prepare for First Tranche

As the programme has more clarity at this stage, it can prepare for the first tranche. It is usually suggested not to prepare for all the tranches in advance, as it may lead to wastage of time and resources, in case the programme is closed. The activities included in preparing for the first tranche are as follows. Firstly, preparations are to be made to establish the programme’s governance and organisation. Secondly, the physical environment and infrastructure required for managing the next tranches should be specified. Finally, plans are to be developed to establish governance and organisation structure. These steps are repeated for each tranche. In the next screen, we will discuss the last step, that is, ‘approval to proceed’.

7 Step 17 Approval to Proceed

‘Approval to proceed’ involves four steps. It starts with the approval from the Senior Responsible Owner or SRO and the Programme Board for the complete set of documents. These documents describe the programme including its governance and plans. They also describe the business case. Once approved by the SRO, these documents are forwarded to the Sponsoring Group for endorsement. Endorsement by the Sponsoring Group confirms that the programme is designed to meet their expectation and requirements. An objective, unbiased and independent assurance review of the business case is obtained with the help of the Office of Government Commerce or OGC Gateway review. Such a review may be a contractual obligation or an internal assurance review providing an unbiased appraisal regarding the success of the programme. Finally, the Sponsoring Group gives its approval on behalf of the organisation, and authorises the SRO to proceed with the programme, and commits to the investment required for the programme. In a programme, it is not always possible to commit to the total investment, so this decision is taken at the end-of-each tranche. In the following screen, we will focus on the roles and their responsibilities in this process.

8 Roles and Responsibilities

We will focus on the roles, namely, the Senior Responsible Owner, Programme Manager, Business Change Manager or BCM and Programme Office. The SRO is accountable for each step in the process from establishing the infrastructure to developing the blueprint, business case and other governance arrangements. The Programme Manager is responsible to get the work done for most of the steps involved, such as ‘identify and analyse stakeholders’, ‘refine the vision statement’ and ‘develop governance arrangements’ . The Programme Manager also gives inputs to the Business Change Manager when consulted. The BCM is responsible for all the steps that are related to benefits, such as ‘develop the benefits profiles’, ‘validate and model the benefits’, and ‘refine the profiles’. In these steps, the BCMs consult the Programme Manager for inputs. Similarly, the BCMs provide inputs to the Programme Manager during other steps. In certain cases such as ‘identifying the tranches’ and ‘approval to proceed’, the Programme Manager shares the responsibility with the BCM. The Programme Office mostly plays the role of a consultant or provides information needed for the steps. In the next screen, we will discuss programme definition document.

9 Programme Definition Document

The programme definition document is used to consolidate or summarise the information that was used to define the programme. It is more appropriate for a smaller programme, as it is difficult to maintain a complex document for a large programme. The content of the document includes the objectives for the programme and the executive summary. It contains the justification and context of the programme. It also mentions the criteria against which the programme should be measured. It includes the vision statement and blueprint summary, along with the programme roles and responsibilities. It lists the applied governance principles. It also details the summary of the current state. It provides the assurance arrangements and gives a description of the outcomes, risks, projects, benefits map, timescales and information baselines. In the next screen, we will focus on an example based on the concepts discussed.

10 Defining a Programme-Problem Statement

Kylie Honkele, the CFO of Nutri Worldwide Inc., is the SRO of the programme, Nutri Snack. Chao Yin is the Programme Manager and Allan Boyd is the BCM. Kylie, Chao Yin and Allan Boyd are discussing the progress of ‘defining a programme’ process. The discussion is centred on development of blueprint and benefits profiles. The points discussed are listed below: ? Chao Yin, the Programme Manager, will be working on benefits profiles ? Allan Boyd, the BCM, will identify indicators related to outcomes and measuring the benefits ? Kylie Honkele, the SRO, will be responsible for developing the blueprint ? The blueprint, benefits maps, projects dossier and programme plan need to be prepared with the emerging business case ? The blueprint needs to be prepared in great detail by the programme Are all the points listed correct with respect to ‘defining a programme’? Let us discuss the appropriateness of these statements in the next screen.

11 Defining a Programme-Solution

Let us start analysing the statements given in the previous screen. The statement, ‘Chao Yin, the Programme Manager, will be working on benefits profiles’, is incorrect. Development of benefits profiles is the responsibility of the BCM. Therefore, Allan Boyd must take up this responsibility. The second statement, ‘Allan Boyd, the BCM, will identify indicators related to outcomes and measuring the benefits’, is correct. Identifying indicators related to outcomes and measuring benefits is related to development of benefits profiles and therefore, it is the responsibility of the BCM. The third statement, ‘Kylie Honkele, the SRO, will be responsible for developing the blueprint’, is an incorrect statement. Development of blueprint is the responsibility of the Programme Manager. Therefore, Chao is responsible for developing the blueprint. But, as Kylie is the SRO, she is accountable for this activity. The fourth statement, ‘the blueprint, benefits maps, projects dossier and programme plan need to be prepared with the emerging business case’ is correct. To maintain alignment between various documents, it is better to develop them together. The last statement, ‘the blueprint needs to be prepared in great detail by the programme’, is incorrect. The blueprint is not detailed by the programme. The blueprint is detailed by the projects in the programme.

12 Summary

Let us summarise what we have learnt in this lesson: ? The programme plan is developed by bringing together the information on projects, resources, timescales, costs, risks and monitoring and control. ? The business case is developed during the process, ‘defining a programme’. ? The information produced in the process, ‘defining a programme’, can be consolidated to form a complete set of documents with an executive summary.

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